The Mazda Museum

While I’m not a car expert, I do appreciate them.  When I heard Hiroshima was the headquarters of Mazda and had a free museum, I was intrigued.  The cool thing about this museum is that you are actually guided through the actual car assembly line.  The assembly line itself is known to be the longest one in the world.  While the tour is free, space is quite limited so I quickly made a reservation.  Luckily there was space on the days I would be in Hiroshima.  Tours are available in English and Japanese.

The lobby.

The lobby.

The museum itself is really nice.  You see models from all different time periods, notable cars (like the 767B that won the 24 Hours of Le Mans) and cars for future development:

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Mm, RX-7.

Mm, RX-7.

Back in the day.

Back in the day.

Mazda's pride, the 767B, the only Japanese car that won the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

Mazda’s pride, the 767B, the only Japanese car that won the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

...and a nice painting.

…and a nice painting.

The trophy.

The trophy.

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You can also see the famous rotary engines in details and pass by sections on how cars are developed, ranging from the model concept to building the actual frames and engines:

 

Rotary engines.

Rotary engines.

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The material designers use when modeling a concept car.

The material designers use when modeling a concept car.

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Crash testing.

Crash testing.

The best part of the tour by far was the assembly line.  Just next door to the museum is an actual assembly line making a variety of Mazda cars.  You walk through a nice chunk of it and are able to stop and see what each section is in charge of.  I thought it was really cool to see people and machines who are actually working and able to do their job within minutes only to repeat it again for the next vehicle.  Unfortunately I wasn’t allowed to take pictures of the assembly line itself.  Some people were sneakily taking photos but I didn’t want to risk it.

If you like cars in general and happen to be in Hiroshima, I would highly recommend the Mazda Museum.  It’s free and you’re able to see a lot of things up close and personal.  The assembly line itself was worth it.

Just a few of the many cars you see.

Just a few of the many cars you see.

Mazda's timeline.

Mazda’s timeline.

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One response to “The Mazda Museum

  1. Pingback: To Nagoya: Toyota Automobile Museum | The Space Between Two Worlds

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